Katrina Kuzminer Photography – Local Weddings

For a while it seemed like I would find Katrina photographing almost every wedding that I was decorating! Needless to say, I soon got to know Katrina very quickly and had the pleasure of creating the bouquets for her own wedding this past summer.

Katrina’s talent and passion for her work stands out in every photo. I just love how she captures such a bright and airy feeling in each shot! Browse below to find more photos by Katrina Kuzminer Photography.

Aimee and Kristopher

Lindsay and Matthew

Blake and Alex

 

Melanie and Walter

 

Krystal and Jonathon

 

Vanessa and Alex

 

Amy and Ryan

 

Along with wedding photography, Katrina also loves doing portraits, family photos and other lifestyle photography. To check availability or see more photos by Katrina, visit her on Facebook.

Rustic and Vintage Wedding Flowers

Flower crown

I met with the bride’s Mom, Dawn a few days ago to discuss flowers for her daughter Alyson’s wedding next year. Dawn had handmade some silk flowers in different pretty coloured ribbon and wanted me to incorporate them in her daughter’s bouquet. I thought this idea was adorable!

We decided on permanent flowers for the bouquets. Not only did the idea of permanent flowers seem to best match Dawn’s handmade flowers, it also allowed her daughter to see her bouquets while she was home visiting her mother for Thanksgiving.

I set up a mutual Pinterest board that the three of us, Dawn, Alyson and I could use to exchange wedding bouquet ideas.The guidelines for me to work within included incorporating both a rustic and vintage feel, use fall colours with out the typical yellows and oranges, incorporate burlap, Dawn’s flowers and other decorative items she provided.

Fall boutonnieres

Three days later I was at their door on Thanksgiving delivering the finished flower arrangements. Alyson was absolutely delighted with her wedding bouquet and also loved the added flowers that her Mother had made!

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Get the Scoop on True Blue Flowers

Blue foliageIf you’re planning to have blue flowers for your wedding, this list will come in handy!

True blue is actually a very rare colour for flowers. Due to the process of pollination, flowers simply naturally select red and yellow pigments over blue, because those colours attract more insects and birds. In more than 280,000 flowering plant species around the world, less than 10% produce blue flowers. In floral design, purple is usually used as a substitute for blue. But, there are a few varieties that we florists are able to get our hands on! Below is a list that I have compiled of different blue flora, however short it may be!

Blue spring bulb flowers are common flowers that florists use and include:
Muscari – rather small in size, these flowers are also called grape hyacinth.
Hyacinth – these flowers are also known for their wonderful scent.
Iris – probably the most popular blue bulb flower and also come in shades of purple and white.

Very common blue mass flowers:
Agapanthus – native to South Africa, these bulb flowers are available most of the year.
Hydrangea – a popular wedding flower, available in light blue as well as white, green and other colours.

Other common blue flowers that florists will carry:
Delphinium – this is a very blue line flower, meaning that it’s blooms grow vertically up the stem.
Blue Eryngium – this flower looks more like a greenery and is available most of the year.

Less common blue flowers that florists may carry:
Bachelor’s Buttons – found north of the equator and is available in late summer.
Echinops – can be cultivated in Canada for the late summer.
Blue Strelitzia Reginae – or Blue Birds of Paradise, are white and blue tropical flowers. These flowers are extremely rare.
Blue Viburnum Berries – sometimes available in late summer or early fall.

Blue Foliage:
True blue foliage is extremely rare, probably even more so than blue flowers. Below I have compiled a short list of foliage that has cool tones, although none of these are true blue. But these greeneries will often give you the feeling of blue, especially when mixed with brightly coloured  flowers like yellows, oranges and hot pinks.

Succulents – these plants are actually considered a flower, but for our purposes I have placed them with foliage. They come in many varieties including ‘hen and chicks’.
Eucalyptus – available all year round and come in many different varieties including: Sprial, Seeded, Silver Dollar, Gunni and Parvifolia.
Dusty Miller – more silver than blue, this velvety foliage is also available year round.
Lambs Ear – quite velvety, similar to Dusty Miller.

 

Part 2: Green, Eco-Friendly Wedding Bouquets

 

Eco-Friendly Weddings Detail

A Bridal Bouquet is the most important arrangement in a bridal flower order. It is a direct expression of You, so it should be everything you’ve dreamed!

Yesterday’s post was about ways to make the flowers for your wedding a little greener, as well as ways to make your centrepieces a little more eco-friendly. Today’s post is focusing on: Your Bouquet!

Hand-tied vs. Wired Wedding Bouquets
Wired wedding bouquets use A LOT of tapes and wire, as well as hard plastic and foam bouquet holders (not biodegradable!). Hand-tied bouquets use no wire and a minimal amount of tape (if any). Instead, their stems are tied and wrapped by hand, with ribbon (or fabric, etc.)  

Cascading Wedding Bouquets
Some styles of cascading wedding bouquets are still possible without all the wire, tapes and bouquet holders. Ask your florist about floral varieties that easily drape, namely Phalaenopsis Orchids, Dendrobium Orchids, Lisianthus/Eustoma, Bupleurum, Amaranthus, Asparagus Plumosa, and Variegated Lily Grass. Using flowers that are already cascading in nature allows your florist to create a hand-tied, cascading bouquet, more easily. Be open to your florist’s suggestions because they know best!

Green Accents for Your Wedding
Replace plastic based ribbons with cotton based materials or natural fibres like twine or burlap. Or again, think re-purpose! I have a bride next month who asked me to incorporate leftover fabric into her wedding order, which was from tailoring her bridesmaids dresses. Just be creative! And have fun doing it! 

*Above photo:
Check yesterday’s post for the ingredients for the above photo.